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Questions

When does primary dysmenorrhea typically present?

A. Adolescent years

B. After the age of 25

C. After the age of 45

D. Right before menopause

A. Primary dysmenorrhea typically presents in the adolescent years, about 6 to 12 months after menarche, or when regulatory ovulatory cycles are established.

B. After the age of 25 is more likely for women with secondary (not primary) dysmenorrhea.

C. After the age of 45 would be too late given regulatory ovulatory cycles are established at a much younger age.

D. Right before menopause would be too late given regulatory ovulatory cycles are established at a much younger age.

An 18-year-old patient is newly prescribed ibuprofen for the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea. Her primary care provider has referred her to you to assist with the treatment plan. How would you counsel the patient regarding the administration of ibuprofen?

A. Start therapy on the first day of menses and continue therapy on a scheduled basis for the first 24 hours of menstruation.

B. Start therapy on the last day of menses and continue therapy on a scheduled basis until the next menstrual cycle.

C. Start therapy on the first day of menses and continue therapy on a scheduled basis for the first 48 to 72 hours of menstruation.

D. Give therapy on the last day of menses only.

C. This is the treatment recommendation for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea.

A. Therapy should be continued on a scheduled basis for the first 48 to 72 hours, not just the first 24 hours given that the pain is typically present for up to the first 72 hours of menstruation for many patients.

B. Therapy should be started on the first day (not last day) of menses and continued on a scheduled basis for the first 48 to 72 hours only.

D. Therapy should be started on the first day of menses, not the last day.

Which of the following menstruation-related conditions would be most likely the diagnosis for a 34-year-old woman who complains of new onset lower abdominal pain beginning approximately 5 days before and through the end of her menstrual cycle?

A. Primary dysmenorrhea

B. Secondary dysmenorrhea

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