Skip to Main Content

This card is designed to provide example statements and prompts for the practitioner learning to use motivational interviewing (MI).

| Download (.pdf) | Print

Observer

 Pay attention to this content.

Express Empathy1

PEARLS©: Partnership, Emotion, Appreciation, Respect, Legitimization, Support

Partnership: “Let’s work on this together.”

Emotion: “You say you’re frustrated.”

Appreciation: “I give you a lot of credit for all you are doing.”

Respect: “This has been a difficult time for you.”

Legitimization: “Most people in your position would feel the same way.”

Support: “I am committed to helping you reach your goals.”

Avoid Argument by Listening for and Reinforcing Change Talk2

Patient statements: Desire: “I wish I could…”; Ability: “I could/might be able to…”; Reasons: “This would be good for me…”; Needs: “I really need more exercise…”; Commitment: “I will/intend to…”; Taking steps: “I’ve been doing…”

Pharmacist statements for supporting self-efficacy: “That’s healthy thinking, saying you know you need to [quit smoking].”; “You’re thinking in ways that are going to go a long way toward where you want to head.”

Support Self-Efficacy2

Avoid using words that trigger risk of failure: “diet,” “exercise,” “quitting smoking”

Use small steps to encourage big change: “cutting back on the number of cigarettes per day”; “changes in some of the foods you choose”; “getting more activity in your day”

Convey you care and respect autonomy: “May I tell you what concerns me?” (The “insurance card”)

Provider statements for supporting self-efficacy: “That’s healthy thinking, saying you know you need to quit smoking.”

“You’re thinking in ways that are going to go a long way toward where you want to head.” “Making it to the appointment today is a demonstration that you care about doing your best.”

Pharmacist

MI Skill Goals

The Ruler2

Assess Readiness, Importance, and Confidence: “On a scale of 1 to 10, 1 is not at all ready and 10 being completely ready, how ready are you to quit smoking?” Patient says: “6”

”Okay, you say you are a 6. Why do you say you are a 6 and not a 3?”

Asking why higher and not lower, can surface patient’s motivations.

This can give insight into the patient’s desires, abilities, and reasons for change and/or needs.

The Envelope2

”If I were to give you an envelope, what would the message inside have to say for you to think about [ ]?”; “What would have to happen for you to think about []?”; “What will your life be like when you []?”

The Insurance Card2

”May I tell you what concerns me?”

References

1. +
Chou  C, Cooley  L. Communication Rx. McGraw-Hill Education; 2018.
2. +
Berger  BA, Villaume  WA. Motivational Interviewing For Health Care Professionals: A Sensible Approach. American Pharmacists Association; 2013.

Pop-up div Successfully Displayed

This div only appears when the trigger link is hovered over. Otherwise it is hidden from view.