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Patient Case 1

Sarah is a 24-year-old pharmacy intern working in a community pharmacy. She has developed a positive rapport with many of the patients who fill their prescriptions at her pharmacy location. One patient in particular, RJ, reminds Sarah of her now deceased grandfather. She often calls him during her shifts to “check on him” and make sure his blood glucose readings are within goal. RJ’s primary care provider (PCP) has asked the community pharmacy to send in RJ’s glucose readings every week. Lately, RJ has asked Sarah not to send his logs because he does not want his PCP to know he has not been following his diet. RJ has also been asking for only Sarah to help him when he comes to the pharmacy. He has begun to call the pharmacy asking for her when she is working although he does not need any prescriptions filled.

Please reflect on the following questions:

  1. Is transference and/or countertransference present? Why or why not?

  2. If so, how could the therapeutic relationship be affected?

  3. How could Sarah move forward in regards to her professional relationship with RJ?

Patient Case 2

AJ is a 24-year-old man admitted to an inpatient medical unit for alcohol and benzodiazepine detoxification. Taylor, the student-pharmacist on rotation covering the unit, meets with AJ to complete a medication reconciliation. Throughout the encounter, Taylor feels extremely irritated with the patient as he keeps asking for more lorazepam, although his Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment for Alcohol, Revised (CIWA-Ar) scores indicate his alcohol withdrawal is minimal. Taylor ends the encounter early and leaves the encounter frustrated at not obtaining the information she needed regarding his outpatient medication use. Taylor tells her preceptor that AJ is a “frequent flier” and will start using substances again once discharged, so she is not going to waste her time when there are other patients who actually want her help.

Please reflect on the following questions:

  1. Is transference and/or countertransference present? Why or why not?

  2. If so, how could the therapeutic relationship be affected?

  3. How could Taylor move forward in regards to providing care for AJ?

Patient Case 3

EF is a 65-year-old man presenting to an ambulatory care clinic for his first appointment. He was referred to the pharmacist, Amanda, for medication nonadherence. Amanda spoke with EF’s primary care provider prior to the appointment, and the provider expressed frustration that EF is stubborn and won’t “do what he’s told.” The provider tells Amanda that he hopes she can “talk some sense” into EF; otherwise he is not sure what else he can do for him. Amanda calls the patient the day before the appointment and reminds him of the appointment time and to bring in his medication bottles. During the appointment, EF tells Amanda that she is “too young ...

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